Jax Wechsler

Researching value with Jobs To Be Done

Understanding value is critical for innovation and new/improved products & services
Clay Christenson has a very useful tool for considering value – Jobs To be Done.

We hire products and services to do things for us.
By thinking about the jobs that we seek assistance to do can helps to understand the value that products/services supply, helping us to improve them. Thinking about jobs, considers human needs, and cuts across demographic factors. It enables us to generate behavioural insights to inspire change for the better.

In this video below Clay Christenson explains the concept using a  milkshake example.
You will see from this video what a useful research approach enables.

This approach is recommended for marketers however it is a great way to discover the meaning-based needs that can lead to innovations.

Below  is a  video about Disruptive Innovation and Jobs To Done. It talks about how this approach can be used to enable social outcomes for example within education delivery.

 

Interested in using this approach to help you uncover the needs of your customers/service recipients?

The following is borrowed from  http://innovatorstoolkit.com/content/technique-1-jobs-be-done

Jobs to be done tree

There are two different types of JTBDs:

  1. Main jobs to be done, which describe the task that customers want to achieve.
  2. Related jobs to be done, which customers want to accomplish in conjunction with the main jobs to be done.

Then, within each of these two types of JTBDs, there are:

  • Functional job aspects—the practical and objective customer requirements.
  • Emotional job aspects—the subjective customer requirements related to feelings and perception.

Finally, emotional job aspects are further broken down into:

  • Personal dimension—how the customer feels about the solution.
  • Social dimension—how the customer believes he or she is perceived by others while using the solution.

Here are some examples…..

Jobs to be Done example

 

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